Interviews

Interviews

Interviews

Dr Pilar Caamaño Sobrino, NATO

Dr Pilar Caamaño Sobrino, NATO

1. You will be speaking at ITEC 2019; what is the context to your work on the topic you will be presenting? 

Within NATO, the benefits of the use of simulation for training are well known and highly recognised. The work that we have initiated, and which initial approach is presented in this paper, aims at identifying if and how M&S can be applied in other areas such as Warfare Development, Planning, Support to Operations and Assessment using M&S-based tools to inform methodologies such Wargaming, Course of Action Analysis or Analysis of Alternatives.
 

2. What is the industry context here? Are you targeting specific requirements, challenges or market demand with this work?

Even when we are talking about M&S-based tools, the final use of the tools is different from those used for training. The new requirements that these new areas of use for M&S bring with them open up new opportunities and challenges to industry to fulfil these demands. Our goal with this work is to inform about the new NATO requirements on M&S and to understand how to leverage on current and future National capabilities to support the NATO needs in this new area of application.


3. How important do you consider ITEC for the training and simulation industry?

ITEC is one of the most important venues in the field and a great opportunity to meet all the stakeholders of the community. The simulation community has a great opportunity in ITEC to meet the industrial partners and to have a hands-on experience and face-to-face meetings for better sharing of requirements, needs, solutions and understanding.

 
4. What are some of the things you most look forward to seeing at this year’s event?

Due to the topic of my research, I would like to see more developments opening the application areas of M&S to Wargaming, or in general terms analysis. I have seen some samples during past ITEC editions, but the room for growing in this area is still wide. In some cases, there is not the need to start from scratch but to re-adapt developments used for training towards more analytical approaches.


5. What do you think the training industry needs to be focusing on the most right now?

If we talk about training, my opinion is that industry have to look towards user-friendliness and human interaction, and the consolidation of the technologies as well. Sometimes industry bombarded the users with new alternatives or evolutions of technology at a faster rate than its acceptance. This can be overwhelmed for the users and counterproductive for industry.

Then there is a need for training and education on M&S itself as a methodology: this is maybe not a direct opportunity for industry, but it would represent a future enabler to develop new markets, such as the support to analytical usage of simulation.
 

6. What challenges are you seeing in the market at present?

In my opinion, standardization and distributed interoperability are the challenges that I see at present. I think we should take the most for technology and used it to its highest potential providing the users easier ways to use it, facilitating the process and not burdening them.

With a link to our research, out of the education on M&S briefly described in the previous answer, we foreseen future requirements to support a better informed decision making process.
 

7. What are some of the most exciting developments/trends in this space right now?

In my opinion, those that facilitates multi-domain, multi-function, multi-national and multi-cultural experiences, summarizing those that exploit interoperability in its whole spectrum. In all the areas of application, we should leverage on the cross-functional and transversal nature of M&S.

AM Philip Sturley, RAF

AM Philip Sturley, RAF

Air Marshal Philip Sturley CB MBE - Conference Chair

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2019 is ‘Unifying Electromagnetic (EM) Warfare in a Complex World - Together’ – why is unifying EM capabilities (such as EW, SIGINT, Spectrum Management, C4ISR and Navigation/NAVWAR) currently so important?

What has been happening in Ukraine and elsewhere in recent years really has been a wake-up call to Europe to invest in certain capabilities, which our prospective opponents haven’t just kept on the boil, but have greatly enhanced over the last twenty years. To meet that challenge, unification is critical; if we’re all in the same game we can learn by cross-fertilising our ideas and working together – all of which is so important in what is really a very uncertain time.

 

Is there a risk that EW capabilities can become stove-piped otherwise?

Yes, if you’re not careful that is so. When money is tight - which it is across Europe -unfortunately history has shown that EW can be the component that loses out. In Afghanistan for many years the focus changed from the wider EW spectrum to countering the specific threat faced in that theatre: the IED. It was killing a lot of our people, so it is quite right that priority investment went into specifically countering that from an EW point of view. But what happened in parallel was that there was investment ongoing elsewhere in the world, and Ukraine and Crimea showed us the extent to which our potential aggressors and enemies have continued to invest very heavily in very capable systems.

 

Is it fair to say that this has led to Western nations being caught off-guard by this return to peer or near-peer warfare?

After the Berlin Wall came down, many nations cashed in on the so called ‘peace dividend’, and we are now having to relearn some of the hard lessons that we knew during the Cold War. This is not Cold War 2, but everything has moved on and we are playing catch up in certain areas. There are areas, however, in which things are very good, but it is the wider spectrum of capabilities that has suffered. Which is why AOC EW Europe is such an important event, as it really is the place to hear about all the latest developments.

 

Are the extent and capabilities of EM operations coupled with Information Operations/Warfare sufficiently well understood across the military and government in the free world?

I think there is an ongoing need for education in the fact that EW is no longer a niche technology. I think the emergence of the cyber threat has brought that home, and both involve exploitation and dominance of the electromagnetic domain. But unless cyber and EW capabilities are developed together they will not make best use of the available funding, so that’s another reason we need to take a unified approach.

 

Thinking about hybrid warfare, A2/AD and the multi-domain battle, as examples, how should government, industry and the military prepare? 

There are a couple of things to focus on, and one is to revisit the whole concept of deterrence. That means having credible capabilities for our own forces including offensive and defensive cyber and EW capabilities. We also have to train as we fight, and that means realistic major exercises. These are things we used to do very well and frequently, which we are having to revisit now to demonstrate to potential aggressors that we have the will and capability to defeat them if they are aggressive toward us. This is why NATO has forward deployed troops in the Baltic states, for example, to give a very clear message that we mean business – that’s part of the necessary deterrent.

 

So the fact that EW Europe is taking place in Sweden this year is quite fitting? 

Yes. Sweden is in a key geostrategic position, and even though they have not decided whether to join NATO, they have always had an advanced technological industry, and have kept pace with EW technologies. So it’s going to be a very interesting opportunity to see what capabilities they are developing as a sovereign independent country, with a worldwide customer base. Stockholm is also such a welcoming city, and ideally suited to hosting such an international event.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over recent years and is it going in the right direction?

The AOC has always provided an excellent focus, and in  terms of companies and research organisations, there are certainly enough players in the market, but the real question is, ‘where’s the cash?’ Where there is proper investment there is good work being done. But the way of the world at present is that money is tight. This is to why we need to work together – that may sound obvious, but it is particularly true in the EW world. And while companies that have very niche capabilities tend to be rightly protective of their IP, we are seeing some interesting amalgamations between different companies to pursue EW solutions together, and to me that’s very sensible and is another reason why conferences such as AOC EW Europe are so important.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

Budgets are a big issue. It is fair to say that the US dominates the world in EW, but Russia and China are specialising in certain areas that would give even the most advanced western countries a run for their money. But there is still opportunity in Europe despite lack of cash, because as Churchill said if you don’t have money to throw at a problem, you really have to think. And it’s really interesting to see that some European companies are coming up with very clever solutions that are actually better than what is available elsewhere.

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EM environment / domain?

Delegates can expect to come away with a lot. As the event is sponsored by the AOC, which is the world leading association of EW practitioners, we attract first class speakers who are talking about problems at the very highest levels, and the quality of presentations is very high. Attendees will get updates on the latest technologies, but will also get to see how that technology is being employed by credible practitioners, who are doing the job in combat conditions every day. That is one of the top things about the AOC EW Europe – it mixes the techy things with the operators, to the benefit of both.

Col Athanasios Chouliaras, Hellenic Air Force

Col Athanasios Chouliaras, Hellenic Air Force

HAF Colonel (Veteran) Athanasios Chouliaras

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2019 is ‘Unifying Electromagnetic (EM) Warfare in a Complex World - Together’ – why is unifying EM capabilities (such as EW, SIGINT, Spectrum Management, C4ISR and Navigation/NAVWAR) currently so important?

The operating environment is becoming exceedingly more difficult along the evolution of target profiles, advanced threat capabilities, continued innovative weapons proliferation, increased UAV, stealth assets utilisation as well as the cyber attack risk.

According to this EM environment, all systems must coordinate and establish connection with an interoperable and high-dense demanding integrated network.

In the context of joint operations, all domains (EW, SIGINT, Spectrum Management, C4ISR and Navigation/NAVWAR) need to interoperate with multi sensor platforms in order to support and optimise the mission planning, data process, information fusion, dissemination and targeting, using smart weapons for soft and hard kill.

To ensure the synergy and avoid electronic fratricide, all actors must consider the EME when planning and employing all the above domains. Therefore one focus is the development of state-of-the-art tools for command and control of EW and the capability to enable fast exchange of ISR/EW data as a key to success.

 

Are the extent and capabilities of EM operations coupled with information operations / warfare sufficiently well understood across the military and government in the free world?

Ι believe that military and government services gradually understand the important of EM operations coupled with information operations (IO)/warfare (IW).

For this purpose, according to recent efforts the consists of the above formal domain and electromagnetic spectrum management (EMSM) is a part of EW/CYBER Concepts. In joint EM operations, EMSM is one of the military capabilities that are integrated to conduct IO.

IO seek to affect adversary information and information systems while defending friendly information and information systems. IO strategies support military missions and are in consonance with guidance provided in NATO and partners unified command plan, joint strategic capabilities plan, and defence planning guidance documents. These strategies require integrated and synchronised offensive, defensive, and exploitive actions to counter, protect against, and learn of threats presented at any given time.

Since the collection, processing, storage, and transmission of information often rely on EM energy, EW is an essential part of IO and EMSM consist of a part of IO activities conducted during time of crisis or conflict.

 

Thinking about hybrid warfare, A2/AD and the multi-domain battle, as examples, how should government, industry and the military prepare?

The military operations against hybrid threats and A2/AD must integrate IO into a ‘Concept of Operations’ regarding to Joint ISR/EW operations in order to respond to the new geostrategic challenges. The whole of the governments and industries must also work towards more effective dissemination of new requirements and new threats evolution.

Since hybrid warfare attempts to defeat a nation’s will, a comprehensive information effort is necessary to: generate effects for military operations; attack the hybrid adversary’s will; isolate the adversary diplomatically; and maintain international support for the military campaign.

All the government and military services, trying to prevent war must develop a ‘concept of operation’ which will support establishing information conduits into conflict areas in short time and collaborating with joint, interagency, intergovernmental and multi-national partners.

Technical enablers such as electronic warfare and cyber activities are critical to combating A2/AD threats, as is controlling how adversaries view our operations through use of operations security and military deception.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over recent years and is it going in the right direction?

The efforts of the EW community help us to coping against future threats and develop further our doctrine bases. In the electronic operations, which take place from the strategic and military-strategic level through the operational to tactical tasks together with cyber, begins as a common capability idea in the armed forces with the idea of electronic operations. In this context, I can mention that the development, in terms of responses to modern and, above all, hybrid threats, can very dynamically affect our EW community in the area of anticipation in the electromagnetic operation sphere.

In particular, I expect that the asymmetric, hybrid sector will increase in the future and the time to react will by much shorter. For this purpose, it is recommended closer interactive with the international data link community in order to exchange requirements in how to upgrade the integration and interoperability of ISR and EW systems with C2 battle management platforms.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically? 

The biggest challenge for European forces and the NATO Alliance is to investigate how quickly and effectively they can respond to new requirements and perspectives in order to be protected against the new ‘threats’, following the ‘modern trends’ in the context development of ‘strategic concept’ which will ensure the ‘defence and security’.

Following the ‘hybrid and information warfare’ challenges, it is mandatory a ‘concept of operation strategic concept’ to be developed, according to which the armed forces are able to carry out joint operations with all domain assets which have to interoperate in order to optimise the ‘joint ISR/EW operation effectiveness’, saving resources.

Particularly the DL interoperability is a major challenge in order to achieve the Joint ISR/EW effectiveness with ‘integrated network-centric C2BM systems.

 

What can delegates expect to take away from your session? 

My session will focus on a proof that a ‘concept of operations’ needs to develop the next generation requirements regarding the ‘integrated network – centric C2BM systems’ with innovative open architecture and DL interoperable implementation which will play a significant role in the information process, exploitation, dissemination (PED), creating a common tactical picture and C2BM enhance, optimising thus the joint ISR and EW operation interoperability and effectiveness.

My presentation will highlight the importance of ‘DL interoperability’ in the interface capability of joint forces assets via ‘integrated DL networks’ in order to enhance the joint operation effectiveness into all domains.

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EM environment / domain?

EW Europe affords the opportunity to bring together militaries and industry partners from across the European continent as well as other countries involved in European defence and NATO alliance.

Future capabilities should ensure that they provide the level of support necessary to overcome todays challenges in order to keep NATO at the edge of operations within the EME.

Forums like EW Europe provide the almost unique opportunity for liaising civilian and military end users, scientists and industry. Given the rapid developments in the operational environment and the security situation, discussions about challenges and possible solutions can be supported by bringing all the actors together. Technical solutions alone will not guarantee EME superiority, only the integration of modern systems, people and processes into the decision making cycle will support superiority in operations.

Julien Chesaux, Kudelski Security

Julien Chesaux, Kudelski Security

Julien Chesaux is a Cyber Security Consultant at Kudelski Security, a Swiss and American cyber security company. Julien mainly works on cyber security training, security awareness strategies and programmes, provides information security and geopolitics analysis in order to help clients to find solutions regarding their threats. He is also a mediator for the Swiss Think Tank Foraus, the co-founder of the www.stralysis.comand a regular writer of the Cyber Defense eMagazine. He has worked in diplomacy and cyber security for eight years in Switzerland, Australia and France. His main research interests are Global Security, Cyber Security, Geopolitics,and International Affairs.

Cheseaux will present his paper, ‘Cyber-attacks: The Biggest Threat for Future Weapons’ at the show.

 

Abstract: The complexity of developing armaments and components provides opportunities for hackers who can for example infiltrate defence contractors during the weapon development process. The last U.S. military aircraft, the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II and its ALIS system, exemplifies these issues and the complexity of the geopolitics of armament. Some states have been for a long time accused of cyber intrusions to spy and steal data of aerospace and defence industries. Military aircraft are a special focus because they guarantee air supremacy, which is a vital element on the battlefield. Therefore, thanks to reverse engineering, joint projects and technology transfers, some states can, on the one side, produce the majority of its military’s indigenous armament systems and on the other side, they can know the cyber vulnerabilities of these armaments and launch a cyber attack to paralyse them instead of a traditional kinetic response.

 

Could you provide some details on the topic of your paper?

Cyber warfare is going to play an increasingly, even vital, role in warfare. This paper will touch upon the new issue regarding the complexification and diversification of armaments development with a focus on their intrinsic vulnerabilities that a hacker can exploit. In a world where externalisation of services is the common practice, the loss of control of all the weapon development process increases cyber threats and risks that can have a kinetic impact. Plus, the more data used in armaments, the more their vulnerabilities. Thus, future attacks will not be lethal ones but cyber ones with kinetic/lethal effects (for e.g., Stuxnet in 2010) and all battlefields and armaments are concerned.

 

Why you have chosen to use EW as a platform to address this topic?

Electronic Warfare Europe is the right audience because cyber attacks add a toolbox of possibilities to military attacks and it increases the attack surface of a target. Both means are intertwined in the future battlefield. Plus, cyber attacks target the same spectrum of assets as electronic warfare do (people, radar, asset, equipment, infrastructure).

The importance of the cyber space can be in one of these aspects:

• Lack of clarity leads to instability: Lack of doctrine, strategic and policy guidance. Governments do not yet know how to retaliate to a cyber attack: What is the red line? How to retaliate? With a cyber or a conventional attack? At which scale? Most of these unresolved questions create instability and let hackers proliferate and navigate within the cyber space with low or no consequences.

• Cyber arms race: If the trend continues with the increase of malware production from private companies and governments, we can end up in a cyber arms race (like the one that happened with nuclear weapons) with a cyber military industrial complex.

• Cross-battlefield issues: NATO assumes cyber space as a fifth battlefield (Sea, Land, Air, Space) but at the same time cyber issues are cross-battlefields.

• NCW at risk: Cyber attacks are a direct threat to mature military states relying on network-centric warfare capability with an OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act) approach (e.g. C4ISTAR).

• Asymmetrical modus operandi: Cyber attacks are cheap and do not necessarily require a long and huge investment to be efficient. Thus, its use is increasing on the side of the less equipped actors.

Asif Anwar, Strategy Analytics

Asif Anwar, Strategy Analytics

Asif Anwar, Executive Director - Strategic Technologies - Strategy Analytics

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2019 is ‘Unifying Electromagnetic (EM) Warfare in a Complex World - Together’ – why is unifying EM capabilities (such as EW, SIGINT, Spectrum Management, C4ISR and Navigation/NAVWAR) currently so important?

 

Being able to unify the different EM capabilities is central to the issue of dealing with the data tsunami that is presented to the warfighter in the digital battlefield. Spectrum management will be central to unifying EM capabilities across systems so that the available bandwidth can be optimised in conjunction with the latency and economics of the EM environment, aka the network, in which systems are operating. This will be achieved using increasingly complex modulation schemes in conjunction with phased arrays and underpinned by solid-state semiconductor technologies. Doing so will enable systems to scale across platforms and domains while enhancing commonality and efficiency of operations and this will evolve towards AI-enabled multi-RF systems.

 

Are the extent and capabilities of EM Operations coupled with Information Operations/Warfare sufficiently well understood across the military and government in the free world?

At this stage, we still have a long way to go before we are intrinsically linking EM Operations with Information Operations/Warfare. We’re starting to peak outside of these individual stovepipes, but I would suggest that EM Operations are still associated with hardware and battlefield operations while IO/IW is linked to exerting soft power through intelligence capabilities and political strategising.

 

Thinking about hybrid warfare, A2/AD and the multi-domain battle, as examples, how should government, industry and the military prepare?

Scalability and open architectures will be key to addressing these different facets of the modern battlefield. A “one size fits all” solution will not work, and the ability to take a capability and scale it according to the different needs is essential if we are to move away from designing ad hoc systems in silos.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over recent years and is it going in the right direction?

The EW community is becoming more of an integrated solution provider to the broader military machine, rather than being viewed as a group of experts that provide a niche capability that no one else really understands. This continued inclusion of the EW community is essential if we are to avoid the mistakes of the past, where for example, traditional EW skillsets were eroded on the assumption that asymmetric warfare requirements would be the norm moving forwards, even as near-peer adversaries continued to hone their EW capabilities.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

Europe faces some unique challenges, but chief amongst this is the increasing threat from a common near-peer adversary, i.e. Russia, that is challenging individual countries on a near daily basis. Countering these advances at an individual country level restricts the ability of Europe to leverage scale and open architectures, and leads to a disparity in capabilities, which can then be exploited by Russia. Having a way to maintain autonomy and continue to support indigenous capabilities while also working off a common “reference design” - so to speak - is a challenge that needs to be addressed by Europe.

 

What can delegates expect to take away from your session?

Strategy Analytics presentation will discuss the growing opportunity for solid state technologies such as GaN across military radar, electronic warfare and military communications systems. In the area of electronic warfare, there are several programmes and platforms that are looking to use GaN to underpin electronic attack capabilities. One of the core drivers is the ability to use AESA architectures in conjunction with the capabilities offered by this technology to achieve both high power as well as digital flexibility. Delegates that attend the Strategy Analytics presentation will leave with a grounding on how, where and why the GaN defence sector will grow and who the major players are supplying this enabling technology.

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EM environment /domain?

AOC EW Europe provides a truly international gathering of attendees working in the EM domain, while also offering a unique opportunity to savour the individual flavour and capabilities offered by the host nation.

Maj Gen Thomas Süssli, Swiss Armed Forces

Maj Gen Thomas Süssli, Swiss Armed Forces

Divisionär Thomas Süssli, Chief of Armed Forces Command Support Organization, Swiss Armed Forces

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2018 is ‘Innovation and Evolution in Global Electromagnetic Operations’ – why are innovation and evolution currently so important in the EM spectrum?

The hybridity of modern conflicts implies a much superior significance on the intangible spheres of operations, (Cyber-, electromagnetic- and information space), than the last years. The complexity and the increasing number of confrontations, rise daily higher in all does spheres and takes already a part in the military ops today. The opportunity to be innovative in the AOC EW Europe, across political borders and in international environment, is already a great change for us and for all. Networking and shared thinking show an outstanding solution approach to today's challenges.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over the past 12 months?

The efforts of the EW / EWar community help us to coping against future threats and develop further our doctrine bases. In our case of electronic operations, which take place from the strategic and military-strategic level through the operational to tactical tasks together with Cyber, begins as a common capability idea in our armed forces with the idea of electronic operations. In this context, I can mention that the development, in terms of responses to modern and, above all, hybrid threats, can very dynamically affect our EWar community in the area of anticipation in the electromagnetic operation sphere.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

The challenges EWar take place every day and are an active part of our work; it happens any time and any wear. In particular, we expect that the asymmetric, hybrid sector will increase in the future and the time to react will by much shorter. The biggest challenge is the link of EWar with Cyber and Information's.

 

What can delegates expect to take away from your session?

We want to explain our doctrine, our means and our procedures in the field of the EWar. We want to show how Switzerland as a neutral state coping the threats with its armed forces. EWar should not be used isolated it shut by embedded in military operation process, to protect our values of our nation. Therefore, we came to an exchange of ideas on electromagnetic operations on level of national defense in the electromagnetic space.

Col Charles Cosnowski, SSTRATCOM

Col Charles Cosnowski, SSTRATCOM

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2018 is 'Innovation and Evolution in Global Electromagnetic Operations' - why are innovation and evolution currently so important in the EM Spectrum?

Innovation and evolution have always been important in the EMS, but even more so today as our adversaries realise that the speed and effectiveness of our operations is heavily reliant on having nearly full access to the EMS. Our reliance on the EMS is seen as a vulnerability and requires us to stay one step ahead of our enemies which can only be achieved through the use of innovative technologies and continual evolution of our doctrine.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over the past 12 months?

The EW community has made some headway over the last 12 months with getting others (non-EW community) to understand that the EMS is not a utility that will automatically be available during the next conflict but rather a manoeuvre space that will have to be fought for (and sometimes through) in order to achieve our objectives.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

One of the biggest challenges in Europe parallels the same challenges faced in the United States and that is training like we fight. Due to increasing commercial participation in the EMS, it is quite difficult to train our militaries in the same congested and contested environment that can be expected against a near-peer competitor. Not only are we experiencing increasing difficulty in representing these environments, but we are also unable to employ the EW equipment that we possess either due to domestic constraints or potential compromise considerations leading live, virtual and constructive (LVC) environments as the leading option. 

 

What can delegates expect to take away from you session?

Delegates attending my session can expect to take away a better understanding of the emerging United States Joint concept/ doctrine of Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations (JEMSO) and that to effectively operate within the EMS requires the merging of traditional spectrum management (J6) functions with traditional EW (J3) functions, supported by dedicated, real-time intelligence information (J2) and all integrated within a cognitive, adaptive, man-on-the-loop Electromagnetic Battle Management (EMBM) system.

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EM domain?

AOC EW 2018 is a must-attend event for those working in the EM domain because the best way to overcome the issues that we are facing in the increasingly congested and contested EMS is through collaboration and information sharing. Representatives from each country, including the US, should realise that their future fights will not only be fought jointly but also with a coalition. In order to overcome the current challenges in the EMS, we will be required to design systems and follow doctrine that work seamlessly together. 

Col John Edwards, USAF

Col John Edwards, USAF

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2018 is ‘Innovation and Evolution in Global Electromagnetic Operations’ – why are innovation and evolution currently so important in the EM spectrum?

Innovation is a priority for the United States Air Force, Air Force Global Strike Command, and the 28th Bomber Wing because it allows us to leverage new ways and means to fight and win in air, space, cyber and across the electromagnetic spectrum. Within 28th Bomber Wing, innovation in pivotal to our combat readiness and lethality. We are constantly seeking and supporting new ways and means to win. 

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over the past 12 months?

Advances in radars, surface to air missiles and air defense networks continue to drive improvements in the EW community, especially in training and operations. I believe the EW community is constantly adjusting to those changes in order to stay ahead in the classic warfare competition. 

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

There are several areas for improvements by adversaries to their radars, air defence and surface to air missiles, to the increased commercial use of the EM spectrum, to interoperability between allies and partner EW systems. The fusion between cyber and EW also presents opportunities. 

 

What can delegates expect to take away from your session?

Delegates will gain a better understanding of the United States Air Force long range strike in the European theater - the rapid ability to strike form across the world, challenges in training, detailed coordination required, and interoperability improvements. 

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EW domain?

EW Europe affords the opportunity to bring together militaries and industry partners from across the European continent as well as other countries involved in European defense. 

Lt Col Holger Schmör, NATO JEWCS  

Lt Col Holger Schmör, NATO JEWCS  

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2018 is ‘Innovation and Evolution in Global Electromagnetic Operations’ – why are innovation and evolution currently so important in the EM spectrum?

The reliance on the electromagnetic environment (EME) in today’s world, both for the civilian society and particularly during military operations, demonstrates that EW is becoming even more central to NATO’s activities before, during, and after operations across the spectrum of conflict. To ensure synergy and avoid electronic fratricide, all actors must consider the EME when planning and employing EW. Innovation and evolution are among the very basics of ensuring success in all missions, avoiding own vulnerabilities. Therefore one focus is the development of state-of-the-art tools for command and control of EW and the capability to enable fast exchange of EW data as a key to success.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over the past 12 months?

Electronic Warfare has always found itself in an environment of changing interest. Like a waveform, the EW community faces its ups and downs. The current security environment has had the effect of a revival of interest in EW issues. This revival causes significant pressure on actors and organizations to utilise the operational need for prevailing in a contested EME. Increasing awareness of the importance of EW, especially in coordination with the other domains including Cyber and Space is crucial.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

The increasingly contested EME in a densely populated geographical region like Europe is a challenge of its own. The ever growing number of technical equipment and networks relying on unimpeded access and usage of the EME is an opportunity and a challenge at the same time. New capabilities are likely to pose potential vulnerabilities that must be protected, hidden or defended. It is a challenge to raise the awareness of civilian and military leaders. It is however vital to gain the decision makers’ understanding and support and to integrate a level of situational awareness with regard to the contested EME and the challenges we face.

 

What can delegates expect to take away from your session?

The changing operational environment for NATO poses a significant challenge for many actors in the functional area of EW. The operational context of EW is changing, leading to new training and capability requirements for the services and the joint level. Ongoing training activities and possible doctrinal implications must meet modern operational needs. I will outline a potential “to achieve” list that will give an idea of the future EW activities from a NATO JEWCS point of view.

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EW domain?

Future capabilities should ensure that they provide the level of support necessary to overcome today’s challenges in order to keep NATO at the edge of operations within the EME. Forums like AOC Europe provide the almost unique opportunity for liaising civilian and military end users, scientists and industry. Given the rapid developments in the operational environment and the security situation, discussions about challenges and possible solutions can be supported by bringing all the actors together. Technical solutions alone will not guarantee EME superiority, only the integration of modern systems, people and processes into the decision making cycle will finally support superiority in operations.

Lt Col Chris Walls, U.S. Army

Lt Col Chris Walls, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Chris Walls, HQDA G3/5/7, DAMO-CY, Deputy Chief Strategy and Policy, U.S. ArmyThe theme of AOC EW Europe 2018 is ‘Innovation and Evolution in Global Electromagnetic Operations’ – why are innovation and evolution currently so important in the EM spectrum?

Evolution is defined as the gradual development of something, especially from a simple to a more complex form.  This definition is reflective of the increasing complexity of operations in the electromagnetic spectrum.  In order to gain and maintain military advantage in the spectrum our military forces must drive innovation within the defense community and public sector to create the capabilities required to meet our military objectives.  Continuing engagement between military and public sector is required to ensure that corporate partners are aware of military priorities and work to provide these unique needs.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over the past 12 months?

Over the last 12 months the US Army has continued to refine its designs for force structure as it works to integrate Cyberspace and Electronic Warfare Operations into land operations across all echelons.Ongoing conflicts continue to provide the increasing importance of Cyberspace and Electronic Operations in all phases of conflict.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

Europe, just as in the US, faces challenges on training Electronic Warfare capabilities in peace time.To ensure readiness Electronic Warfare must be integrated into unit and collective training to train staffs and commanders on available capabilities and how to best integrate them into operations.

 

What can delegates expect to take away from your session?

I will share the US Army’s approach for doctrine, integration into planning and targeting, and force structure for Cyberspace and Electronic Warfare Operations.

Lt Col Judge Bourque, AoC

Lt Col Judge Bourque, AoC

Lieutenant Colonel (Retd) Judge Bourque, Senior Defense Analyst, Expression Networks, AOC Executive Committee Secretary

The theme of AOC EW Europe 2018 is ‘Innovation and Evolution in Global Electromagnetic Operations’ – why are innovation and evolution currently so important in the EM spectrum?

While Allied Forces have demonstrated mastery in producing state-of-the-art technologies and operationally effective systems for application in our EM operating environments, we still lack adoption of a collective operational concept or applying them synergistically and in concert, to provide pre-dispositional advantages to our forces. So while we have innovated in disparate instantiations of technology, we have relaxed in advancing theories of their use.

 

How do you feel the EW community has evolved over the past 12 months?

Across the Allied EW community, there is a new dawning that although we may still conduct meaningful conversations which stop at the bounds of EW - centred on isolated actions and persishable effects - we may not conduct complete conversations within the EM domain until we fully visit the aggregation of effect to yield durable outcomes, affecting operational level manoeuver in the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

 

What do you think are the particular challenges facing EW capabilities in Europe specifically?

The challenges in the European Theatre are not predominantly technical, they are characterised fundamentally by a contest of understanding and investment. Technology peer adversaries in the region are rapidly pursuing advantage not based upon the acquisition and employment of cutting edge systems, but instead by merely "doing what we say", the simple yet deliberate pursuit of EMS technology capacity and organisation.

 

What can delegates expect to take away from your sessions?

 

This presentation challenges the presupposition that incremental and isolated EMS capability advances alone can overwhelm or even pace the exponentially increasing stressors of diversity, density, demand, complexity, and contest worldwide across the EM Domain. By introducing thinking which begins with the EMS as the centre of discussion - versus capability manifestations within it - we will logically arrive to a more informed way of providing adaptive, relevant, decisive and enduring capabilities.

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EM domain?

Geographically spanning centres of high-technology EMS capability production and proximity to potential conflict regions, this truly international symposium uniquely gathers the latest discussions in technology, operations and geopolitical dynamics to offer a world-class forum for the advancement of Allied EMS superiority. As we improve our collective understanding in each of these areas, no event is poised to gather them for greatest effect like the AOC EW Europe annual series.

Lisa Fruge-Cirilli, AoC

Lisa Fruge-Cirilli, AoC

Lisa Fruge-Cirilli, AOC President, AOCThe theme of AOC EW Europe 2018 is 'Innovation and Evolution in Global Electromagnetic Operations' - why are innovation and evolution currently so important in the EM spectrum?

The AOC EW Europe 2018 theme focuses in the critical areas of acquisition, deployment and executability of superior technological capabilities within the EM spectrum. Innovation and evolution along with culture change within the EM spectrum allowing adaptability and responsiveness to the latest threat environment is critical to our future. The AOC is aggressively pursuing a revitalised strategy across all elements of electronic warfare and related disciplines - such as cyber, spectrum control, directed energy SIGINT and information operations - all are absolutely critical to our collective success in waging and winning the battle in the electromagnetic spectrum.

 

Why is AOC EW Europe a must-attend event for those working in the EW domain?

It is no suprise that most of our new AOC chapters are created outside of the US, these days, and I expect this trend to continue. As an international organisation of EM spectrum professionals, the AOC takes seriously its commitment to foster our global EW community - whether it is to help establish new chapters, provide knowledge through AOC courses an webinars, publish JED or to help organise major AOC international events to offer networking and collaboration opportunities, such as AOC EW Europe. 

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