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Interview with Dr Robbert van Vossen, Senior Research Scientist, TNO

Interview with Dr Robbert van Vossen, Senior Research Scientist, TNO

14-Feb-2017 by: Dr Robbert van Vossen

Robbert van Vossen is a senior research scientist at TNO. He received the M.Sc. degree in geophysics from Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands, in 2000 and the Ph.D. degree in seismology (with honors), in 2005. His fields of interests are MCM and ASW. 

 

You will be speaking at UDT 2017 on the topic of ‘Next-generation MCM Concepts-National Visions'.   Can you give us a brief insight into the areas you will be covering?

Next-generation (NG) MMCM moves towards stand-off operations by using unmanned systems. This concept has large potential benefits, but is also results in a complex system-of-systems, with many degrees of freedom: (i) there are many different manned and unmanned MMCM systems, with more in development; (ii) environmental and operational conditions have a large impact on system performance and concepts of employment.

As a consequence, it is not straightforward to select a NG MMCM system toolbox, whereas timely insight in the type and number of (un)manned MMCM systems is required, as it drives operational effect, procurement cost, and the design of mothership and crew. This results in a need for an approach: (i) to aid nations in the selection of their national NG MMCM system toolbox,  and (ii) to identify commonalities between  different nations in order to support joint procurement. Such an approach will be presented. It provides insight in capabilities, limitations, and maturity of NG MMCM system toolboxes. It has been implemented in a database to ensure flexibility to include systems that are in development, and to be able to tailor it to satisfy the needs of different nations.

What can delegates expect to take away from your session?

Many European navies have a maritime mine counter measures (MMCM) capability that was acquired in the 1980’s – early 1990’s. The capabilities were developed for an expected lifespan of 25-30 years, meaning that nations will have to replace their current MMCM capability in the near future.

Next-generation (NG) MMCM moves towards stand-off operations by using unmanned systems. In the session, new CONOPS will be discussed, and insight will be provided in capabilities, limitations, and maturity of unmanned systems. The types and numbers of unmanned systems of which a NG MMCM system toolbox will be composed of do not only influence the operational effectiveness, but also the MMCM ship and crew design. For this reason, timely insight on this topic, including the growth potential (increasing levels of autonomy and integration) during the lifetime of an MMCM ship, are considered as an important aid in procurement decisions.

Find out more at UDT 2017

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